Alexis Ogdie-Beatty, MD, MSCE

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Alexis Ogdie-Beatty, MD, MSCE

Associate Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology

Dr. Ogdie-Beatty’s research program focuses on pharmacoepidemiology and observational studies of psoriatic arthritis, an inflammatory arthritis with potentially devastating outcomes that affects around 30 percent of patients with psoriasis and approximately 500,000 Americans. Her long-term goals are to develop treatment strategies for psoriatic arthritis (PsA) to improve patient outcomes, and  to understand the physiologic aberrations leading to the development of psoriatic arthritis. To improve the quality of care available to patients with PsA, Dr. Ogdie-Beatty is leveraging the PsA clinic that she directs at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania to investigate methods of assessing the effectiveness of treatments for psoriatic disease within clinical practice. In addition, she is leading studies aimed at investigating the pathophysiology of PsA and long-term outcomes of PsA such as cardiovascular disease.

As part of her effort to understand the pathophysiology of PsA, she studies the use of 18-FDG PET/CT as an imaging biomarker for improving the diagnosis and management of psoriatic arthritis. She is also investigating the association of biomarkers of cartilage destruction and new bone formation—important pathologic processes in PsA—with disease activity. Dr. Ogdie-Beatty completed a Master of Science in Clinical Epidemiology in order to integrate pharmacoepidemiology and observational methodology into studies of inflammatory arthritis. As a result of this training, she is an expert in the use of large medical record databases—in particular, The Health Improvement Network (THIN)—to study disease outcomes in PsA.

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